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Download A Companion to Persius and Juvenal (Blackwell Companions to PDF

A better half to Persius and Juvenal breaks new floor in its in-depth concentrate on either authors as "satiric successors"; designated person contributions recommend unique views on their paintings, and supply an in-depth exploration of Persius' and Juvenal's afterlives.

• presents special and up to date suggestions at the texts and contexts of Persius and Juvenal
• deals monstrous dialogue of the reception of either authors, reflecting one of the most cutting edge paintings being performed in modern Classics
• encompasses a thorough exploration of Persius' and Juvenal's afterlives

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A Companion to Persius and Juvenal (Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World)

A better half to Persius and Juvenal breaks new flooring in its in-depth concentrate on either authors as "satiric successors"; specified person contributions recommend unique views on their paintings, and supply an in-depth exploration of Persius' and Juvenal's afterlives.

• presents specified and updated suggestions at the texts and contexts of Persius and Juvenal
• deals gigantic dialogue of the reception of either authors, reflecting essentially the most cutting edge paintings being performed in modern Classics
• features a thorough exploration of Persius' and Juvenal's afterlives

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Extra resources for A Companion to Persius and Juvenal (Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World)

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For then our Lord’s struggles would seem to have no advantage for us, but rather to have been [accomplished] for the sake of show. (142) Theodore also cites Luke’s statement about Jesus growing in age, wisdom, and grace before God and other humans as evidence that supports his conviction that Jesus truly possessed a human intellect: For these two schismatic sects [the Apollinarians and Eunomians] are aware that this [Lucan] testimony is contrary to their teaching when the latter asserts that [the Word] did not assume a soul, and the former that He assumed a soul but not a nous.

For instance, he believes that it is particularly significant that, immediately after John declared that “the Word was made flesh,” he asserts that “He dwelt among us” (John 1:14): So, if the statement “The Word was made flesh” is said [to connote] some change, how then is [the phrase] “He dwelt” to be understood? For it is very clear to all that “He dwells” is different from “He is dwelt in” … For He dwelt in us by assuming our nature by dwelling [in it] and by dispensing everything [needed] for our salvation through him.

In the 1970s, Joanne McWilliam Dewart sought to understand Theodore’s theological thought regarding grace and the meaning of prosōpon. In her book The Theology of Grace of Theodore of Mopsuestia (1971), she studied how Theodore attempted to integrate his views on grace with his emphasis upon Christ’s human free will. ” Afterwards, interest in Theodore shifted once again, but this time to an attempt to better understand the Antiochene method of exegesis, especially through Diodore and Theodore’s commentaries on the psalms.

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